Duggleby History

For visitors to this site interested in the evolving Duggleby Family Tree, starting around the time of the Domesday book (1086), please see the special page by clicking here where you will find a copy of the latest update to the tree.

I have also provided some information about examples of the very old documents used to produce the family tree. If you are interested in these please take a look at my blog entries by clicking herehere and here.

Duggleby, in addition to being a rather unusual family name is also the name of a village in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It was mentioned in the Domesday Book as ‘Difgelibi‘ when detailing the lands and holding of Beringer of Cosney. The Domesday Book was a land survey and census from 1086. It was commissioned by William the Conqueror to assess the extent of the land and resources owned in England to determine what taxes he could raise.

Domesday Book (1086) entry of Duggleby (Difgelibi)

The history of Duggleby can physically be traced back to about 3000 BC because it is the location of Duggleby Howe, one of the largest Round Barrows in Britain. The Barrow or burial mound is presumed to date from the late Neolithic period. It is 37 metres in diameter and aerial photographs show it is surrounded by a circular enclosure, 370 metres in diameter. There are two concentric bronze-age ditches one inside and one outside this enclosure. The origins of the Duggleby Howe are steeped in mystery. Its location is close to the source of the Gypsey Race, a ‘magical’ stream which rises through a series of springs and flows intermittently. This may well have influenced our ancestors’ decision to build Duggleby Howe. Folklore predicts that when the Gypsey race flows bad fortune is likely. Apparently it flowed in the year before the great plague of 1664!

Duggleby Howe, Large Round Barrow or Ancient Burial Mound, Yorkshire, England
Duggleby Howe, Large Round Barrow or Ancient Burial Mound, Yorkshire, England

A series of excavations were performed on the mound in the late 19th century revealing some of its secrets. It would appear that Duggleby Howe was used as a cemetery for a long period of time since the Late Neolithic. Some of the burials appear to have been of important people like chieftains who had flint weapons and ceramic articles buried alongside their bodies as well as tools and artefacts made from from flint, antlers, bones, boar tusk and beaver tooth. Other burials were cremations and the lack of any surrounding vessel or enclosure indicated they may well have been sacrificial offerings, possibly accompanying the burial of local chieftains. The broken bones of the ox, roebuck, red deer, fox, goat, and pig found at the site indicate the burials involved big ceremonial feasts. Interestingly among these were also human bones which had been broken and cooked. It would appear that at least some of the ancient English folk were cannibals (I have included a link for photos and more information about Duggleby Howe in the links section on the right hand side of the archives page).

Duggleby Coat of Arms
Duggleby Coat of Arms

Moving swiftly on from cannibals to my own ‘Duggleby’ history – it has been possible to trace my ancestors back to just after the time when the village of Duggleby was mentioned in the Domesday Book. The most notable early figure was Sir Henry Duggleby (born 1145). To give this some historical perspective this was around the time of the reign of King Richard 1 of England (Richard the Lion Heart, 1157-1199) and the third crusade. Sir Henry Duggleby was my GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT GRANDFATHER (23 ‘greats’). A major acknowledgement is due here to Ellen Reid for her painstaking work and dedication in uncovering much of the documentary basis for this trail.

Duggleby Shield
Duggleby Shield

Clearly some of the earlier dates are approximations. You will also see the variations in spellings of the name as it was registered in the documents over the centuries: it is not just today that people struggle to spell the name Duggleby correctly. A lot of the early information came from Last Will and Testaments. All except the last three generations lived either in Duggleby or villages nearby. The lineage from Sir Henry to myself appears to be as follows (for more detail take a look at the PDF version of the tree available from here):

Duggleby (possibly Difgelibi, first name unknown): Born approx. 1115 – died ? Wife’s name unknown?
|
Sir Henry de Duggleby (de Dingelby) Born approx. 1145 – died ? (Brother Jollan): Wife’s name unknown?
|
Adam Duggleby Born 1195 –? Wife?
|
Adam Duggleby (de Dugleby) 1250 – 1300 (Brother Hugh): Wife Joan
|
Ralph Duggleby (de Dugleby) 1275 –? (Siblings: John, Robert, Adam): Wife?
|
William Duggleby (Willelmo de Dugelbi) 1305 –? (Siblings: John, Walter): Wife?
|
John Duggleby (Dyngelby) 1345 –? (Siblings: William, Robert): Wife?
|
John Duggleby (de Duggylby) 1370 –? (One unknown brother): Wife?
|
William Duggleby (Willim Dogilby) 1402 –? Wife?
|
Duggleby (first name unknown): 1424 –? Wife?
|
Thomas Duggleby (Doggleby of Thornholme) 1460 – 1503 Wife Margaret
|
Walter Duggleby (Doggleby) 1485 –? (Siblings: Joan, Alice): Wife?
|
William Duggleby (Douglebi of North Dalton) 1510 – 1561 (Siblings: Cuthbert, John): Wife?
|
Robert Duggleby (Dugleby, Dougelbe of North Dalton) 1535 – 1589 (Siblings: Roger, Ann): Wife Mabel
|
William Duggleby (Dougilbie) 1575 – 1620 (Siblings: John, Matthew, Richard, John, Audrey, Issabel) Wife Margaret
|
Robert Duggleby 1605 – 1678 (Siblings: William, Thomas, Isabel): Wife Elizabeth
|
John Duggleby 1675 – 1728 (Siblings: Nickolas, Elisabeth, Margaret, Beatrice): Wife Elizabeth
|
David Duggleby 1723 – 1806 (Siblings: John, Rachel, Ann): Wife Elizabeth
|
William Duggleby 1750 – 1794 (Sibling: Rebecca): Wife Elizabeth
|
John Duggleby 1775 – 1830 (Siblings: Michael, William, Mary, Betty, Rebecca): Wife Jane
|
William Duggleby 1804 – 1876 (Siblings: John, David, Bryan, Mary, Elizabeth, Mary, Anne): Wife Ann
|
John Duggleby 1834 – 1911 (Siblings: George, William, Mary, Ann, Elizabeth, Jane, Matilda, Hannah): Wife Ann
|
John William Duggleby 1879 – 1950 (Siblings: Seth, Wilson, Fred, Seth, Tom, George, Barbara, Mary, Frances, Ada): Wife Annie
|
Leslie Duggleby 1907 – 1943 (Siblings: George, Maude, Adeline, Annie): Wife Elizabeth
|
John Leslie Duggleby Born 1937 (Sibling: June): Wife Christine Helen
|
Christopher Leslie Duggleby Born 1958 (Siblings: Matthew John, Helen Louise): Wife Monika
|
Alexander Duggleby Born 1983 and Pascal Duggleby Born 1989

My Father John Duggleby (75) at his daughter Helen's wedding (2012) with wife Christine
My Father John Duggleby (75) at his daughter Helen’s wedding (2012) with wife Christine
Alex and Pascal Duggleby: The Next Generation
Alex and Pascal Duggleby: The Next Generation
The Page in the Domesday Book dated 1086 describing Duggleby (Difgelibi) in Yorkshire
Page in the Domesday Book dated 1086 describing Duggleby (Difgelibi) in Yorkshire

103 thoughts on “Duggleby History”

  1. Chris, you have done a great job researching, organizing, and preserving, the Duggleby family history. My sister and I are on page 103, the children of Reginald Garrett.we live in the US, but my wife and I visit England quite a bit. I have been visiting Duggleby England, since 1970, when I was stationed in Germany. I have been reading a lot about the history of England from 250,000 NC to about 8,000 bc when there was large groups of people crossing Doggerland from Northern Germany to the south of Whitby.
    The ancient history of England is directly linked to previous ice ages, and the tribes that wandered back and forth to Northern Italy. You are fortunate to be living in such a great country that has so much preserved history!

    Garrett Duggleby

    1. Thanks Garrett,
      It is great to hear from you and see we share a passion for our heritage. All the best from ‘Duggleby’ island.
      Chris.

  2. Hello Chris
    My name is Brian Dunn. I am a direct relation to Thomas Duggleby 1780-1846 of Hunmanby through his only daughter Elizabeth who married George Dunn. I am trying to explore the connection with the Cottingham branch.
    Evidence: In the Reighton parish register, on the baptism of Thomas’s first child William in 1805, is the following “William 1st son 1st child of Thomas Duggleby tanner, 1st son of Robert Duggleby of Newland in the parish of Cottingham by Mary his wife”
    Evidence: In the Cottingham parish bishop’s transcript, baptism of Thomas Duggleby, is the following “Thomas son of Mary Duggleby baptized June 30th” (1780)
    Evidence: Inscription on the gravestone of Thomas Duggleby “In affectionate remembrance of Thomas Duggleby 40 years schoolmaster of this place he departed this life 23rd Dec 1846 aged 66 years”

    Conclusion: An as yet unknown Robert Duggleby married Mary and had son
    or Mary Duggleby unmarried by “Robert” had a son.

    I tend to lean towards the latter scenario. The timeline fits Mary daughter of Bryan Duggleby, who would be 21 at the baptism, she also had a child Robert in 1783 (York), without husband. I also have a possible 1793 burial in Beverley of Mary Duggleby of Hull. Lack of husband’s name on baptism tends to support this scenario.

    Do you have any thoughts on this?
    Brian

    1. Hi Brian,
      Thanks for this info, I have to admit to having a bit of a personal interest being born in Cottingham myself (albeit in a maternity ward there). I am in Africa at the moment and my detailed database is on a laptop back at home so I will see if I have anything in my ‘tree’ records when I return to Europe. Meanwhile I know we have a lot of Duggleby family ‘experts’ and some Cottingham locals who monitor the comments on this site so I will publish your request to see if anyone else can help.
      All the best from Cape Town,
      Chris.
      PS I will link this to the “I’m a Duggleby and proud of it” page on Facebook to involve this interest group in your quest for info.

Please share your comments on the site. Thanks - Chris

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Transformation, Risk & Lifestyle

%d bloggers like this: